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Könyvtárak, múzeumok képes leírás - Zsidó.tlap.hu
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Könyvtárak, múzeumok - Zsidó.tlap.hu

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Amerikai Zsidó Történelmi múzeum

Amerikai Zsidó Történelmi múzeum

The National Museum of American Jewish History's mission is to present educational programs and experiences that preserve, explore and celebrate the history of Jews in America. Our purpose is to connect Jews more closely to their heritage and to inspire in people of all backgrounds a greater appreciation for the diversity of the American Jewish experience and the freedoms to which Americans aspire. President's message: I am delighted to welcome you to the National Museum of American Jewish History, the only Museum in the world devoted exclusively to telling the compelling story of Jews in America. Founded in 1976, we are now building a spectacular state-of-the-art museum on Independence Mall that will stand just steps from the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall, at the very birthplace of American Liberty. Our new 100,000-square-foot, five-story building, opening in 2010, will serve as a cornerstone of the American Jewish community and a source of national pride. Our Museum will illustrate how freedom and its choices, challenges and responsibilities, fostered an environment in which American Jews were able to accomplish truly extraordinary things. And since other immigrant ethnic groups have faced similar challenges, the Museum will also be a place for all Americans to explore.

Auschwitzi Zsidó Központ

Auschwitzi Zsidó Központ

In 1995, the Auschwitz Jewish Center Foundation was established in order to rebuild a Jewish cultural, spiritual, and educational center in Oswiecim. In September 2000, the Auschwitz Jewish Center opened its doors to visitors from all over the world. It is a non-governmental organization which exists to serve as a guardian of Jewish memory, as well as to educate the public about the Holocaust. Since August, 2006, the Center has been affiliated with the Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in New York, USA. The Auschwitz Jewish Center consists of: The Jewish Museum The Chevra Lomdei Mishnayot Synagogue The Educational Center The home of the Kornreich family of Oswiecim serves today as a museum commemorating the lives of Jewish residents of Oswiecim. The main exhibition presents the nearly 500 years of Jewish history, tradition, and culture in Oswiecim. Visitors to the Center have the opportunity to connect with Oswiecim's pre-war Jewish life through the exhibition of photographs and artifacts. The photographs of individuals and families, documents and artifacts from local Jewish organizations and businesses, and the Judaica excavated in 2004 from beneath the site of the Great Synagogue of Oswiecim, bring to life the vital Jewish town that Oswiecim once was.

Bécsi Zsidó Múzeum

Bécsi Zsidó Múzeum

Willkommen! Hier erhalten Sie Auskunft über das Jüdische Museum Wien, über seine beiden Standorte Palais Eskeles und Museum Judenplatz, über die aktuellen Ausstellungen, Sammlungen, Vermittlungsprogramme, Veranstaltungen, Archiv, Bibliothek und vieles mehr. Das Jüdische Museum Wien ist ein Ort der Begegnung, Kommunikation und Diskussion. Mit seinen zahlreichen Ausstellungen, seiner zeitgemäßen Darstellung der Wiener jüdischen Geschichte und der jüdischen Religion ist es ein wichtiger und unverkennbarer kulturhistorischer Meilenstein in der Wiener Museumslandschaft. Es ist ein Denkmal für Millionen österreichische Juden, die über Jahrhunderte in dieser, ihrer Heimat gelebt und gewirkt haben. Ohne ihre hervorragenden Leistungen in allen Bereichen wäre Österreich nicht zu dem geworden, was es war und ist; für Hunderttausende österreichische Juden, die im Laufe der Geschichte aus ihrer Heimat vertrieben worden sind; für Zehntausende österreichische Juden, die zu verschiedenen Zeiten - zuletzt in den schrecklichen Jahren 1938 bis 1945 - wegen ihres Judentums ermordet wurden; für Tausende österreichische Juden, die sich auch nach 1945 wieder in Wien niedergelassen haben und einen wesentlichen Anteil am kulturellen und wirtschaftlichen Aufschwung dieser Stadt und dieses Landes hatten und haben - und auch in Zukunft haben mögen.

Diaszpóra Múzeum

Diaszpóra Múzeum

Beit Hatfutsot, the Museum of the Jewish People, tells the unique and ongoing story of the Jewish People, a People among nations, and describes the special bond between the Jewish People and Israel. The museum presents thousands of years of a flourishing, multifaceted culture, bringing to life the unity that underlies the diversity of the Jewish civilization. The story of the Jewish people is told through the permanent exhibition - now going through a process of renewal - as well as through temporary exhibitions, educational activities, and rich digital database resources of Jewish genealogy, family names, communities, photographs, films, and Jewish music. Beit Hatfutsot aspires to: * Provide the young generation with a key to their Jewish identity * Strengthen the sense of belonging to the Jewish People * Enhance the bonds between Jews in Israel and around the world. * Nurture a sense of pride in Jewish heritage, Jewish achievements, and Jewish contributions to the world. * Enable visitors from around the world to learn about the fascinating story of the Jewish people, and understand its unique nature. Nahum Goldmann, the primary thinker behind the idea of establishing Beth Hatefutsoth as a living testament to the Jewish dispersion following the Holocaust, sought to increase knowledge and understanding of the young generation.

Múzeum a babilóniai zsidóságról

Múzeum a babilóniai zsidóságról

The Babylonian Jewry Museum presents chapters in the history of the Jews of Babylon over a period of 2700 years, from the time of their exile from the Land of Israel (721-586 BCE) until their return to the State of Israel by Operation "Ezra and Nehemia" (1950-1952). The ethnographic exhibition shows the life style of the Jews of Iraq, their customs and manners, art and culture. The Jewish settlement in Babylon began with the exile of the residents of Judea and Samaria to Assyria and Babylon between the years 721 and 586 BCE. The electronic map in the museum illustrates the routes taken by the exiles through the five stages of dispersion, and alternately the routes travelled by those returning to Zion in the days of Koresh (538 BCE) and the days of Ezra and Nehemia (middle of the 5 th century BCE). The alley exhibited in the Museum is a reconstruction of one of the side-streets in the Jewish Quarter of Baghdad at the beginning of the 20th century. Here one can see typical houses with their overhanging balconies, and workshops on the lower levels demonstrating all kinds of industries. There is a Tel embroidery workshop displaying clothes and various hand-craft. Further on are gold and silversmith workshops showing the various stages of the craft up to the finished objects.

Prágai Múzeum

Prágai Múzeum

Present at the establishment of the Jewish Museum in Prague in 1906 were the historian Dr. Hugo Lieben and Dr. Augustin Stein, the representative of the Czech Jewish movement and later head of the Prague Jewish Community. The original aim was to preserve valuable artefacts from the Prague synagogues that had been demolished during the reconstruction of the Jewish Town at the beginning of the 20th century. The Museum was closed to the public after the Nazi occupation of Bohemia and Moravia on 15 March 1939. In 1942 the Nazis established the Central Jewish Museum, to which were shipped artefacts from all the liquidated Jewish communities and synagogues of Bohemia and Moravia. After World War II, the Jewish Museum came under the administration of the Council of Jewish Communities in Czechoslovakia. In 1950, ownership was transferred to the State, which, as of 1948, was in the hands of the communists. As a result, the Museum was markedly restricted in its preservation, exhibition and educational activities. The collapse of the communist regime in 1989 created the necessary conditions that led to a change in the Museum´s status. On October 1, 1994, the Museum buildings and collections were returned to the Jewish Community of Prague and the Federation of Jewish Communities in the Czech Republic respectively. At the same time, the Jewish Museum took on new life.

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